Part 3: Pacifism

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Ted on porch in Di Linh. Credit: Brethren Historical Library and Archives. Used with permission.

Ted on porch in Di Linh. Credit: Brethren Historical Library and Archives. Used with permission.

Audio recordings from Ted Studebaker in Vietnam. Audio courtesy of Gary Studebaker. Copies of Ted Studebaker in Vietnam may be purchased from Brethren Press.

Transcription

Ted Studebaker: I heard the other day, and I believe that it’s true that the war is not going to be won over here. It’s going to be won by American—perhaps public—opinion and what a lot of people think. It’s a difficult situation, and I’ve had to adjust my views to what’s going on over here. But one thing I sure haven’t changed in my view and that is on my idea of pacifism and conscientious objection. This remains stronger than ever and even more so since I’ve been here—that you don’t influence people and win friends and win the hearts and minds of people by showing brute force and military might. I don’t care who you’re fighting in the world or how small or large or whether it’s one person in relationship or whether it’s whole nations involved. Defensiveness—offensiveness—just doesn’t in the long run win out.

Editorial: A letter from Vietnam

Credit: Troy Daily News